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Good Night Elmer
Good Night Elmer
Directed By: Charles Jones
Produced By: Leon Schlesinger
Henry Binder (uncredited)
Released: October 26, 1940
Series: Merrie Melodies
Story: Rich Hogan
Animation: Philip Monroe
Layouts: Robert Givens (uncredited)
Backgrounds: Paul Julian (uncredited)
Film Editor: Treg Brown
Voiced By: Mel Blanc
Music: Carl W. Stalling
Starring: Elmer Fudd
Preceded By: Holiday Highlights
Succeeded By: The Sour Puss
Good Night Elmer High Quaity 1940

Good Night Elmer High Quaity 1940

Good Night Elmer (1940)

Good Night Elmer (1940)

Merrie Melodies - Good Night Elmer

Merrie Melodies - Good Night Elmer

Good Night Elmer (LaserDisc)

Good Night Elmer (LaserDisc)

Good Night Elmer is a 1940 Merrie Melodies short directed by Chuck Jones.

Plot

Elmer Fudd attempts to extinguish a candle by his bedside so that he can retire for the night, with the flame always surging again in spite of Elmer's best efforts. Elmer finally succeeds, but only at the expense of wrecking his bedroom in the process, and no sooner than he lies down, the sun comes up, precipitating a nervous breakdown in Elmer Fudd.

Availability

Notes

  • Arthur Q. Bryan didn't voice Elmer in this short, as Elmer did not have any dialogue. Mel Blanc provided the weeping and bawling heard at the end.
  • This short has a special opening rendition of the "Merrily We Roll Along" theme.
  • The credits on the title card are the same as "Elmer's Pet Rabbit". Coincidentally, both were directed by Chuck Jones.
  • Animation of Elmer Fudd crying at the end of the short is recycled animation from Old King Cole crying at the end of "The Merry Old Soul".
  • In some shots of Elmer wrecking the candle with an axe near the end of the short his bare bottom is exposed under his nightshirt.
  • This short marks the first time where Elmer's character design has been finalized; which is using the design basis as in "A Wild Hare" released earlier in the year, minus the red nose. However, this designed was not yet finalized among the Warners directors until "The Hare-Brained Hypnotist" (1942), as from "Wabbit Twouble" (1941) to "Fresh Hare" (1942), Elmer was temporarily redesigned by Bob Clampett to look chubby.
  • Because the short has no dialogue, both American and European dubbed versions keep the original ending card, unlike most dubbed version cartoons, although some non-dialogue shorts "Rhapsody in Rivets" (1941) and "Double Chaser" (1942) got dubbed ending cards. In addition, the original ending music is also kept.

Gallery

External Links

Elmer Fudd Cartoons
1940 Elmer's Candid CameraConfederate HoneyThe Hardship of Miles StandishA Wild HareGood Night Elmer
1941 Elmer's Pet RabbitWabbit Twouble
1942 The Wabbit Who Came to SupperAny Bonds Today?The Wacky WabbitNutty NewsFresh HareThe Hare-Brained Hypnotist
1943 To Duck or Not to DuckA Corny ConcertoAn Itch in Time
1944 The Old Grey HareThe Stupid CupidStage Door Cartoon
1945 The Unruly HareHare Tonic
1946 Hare RemoverThe Big Snooze
1947 Easter YeggsA Pest in the HouseSlick Hare
1948 What Makes Daffy Duck?Back Alley Op-RoarKit for Cat
1949 Wise QuackersHare DoEach Dawn I Crow
1950 What's Up Doc?Rabbit of Seville
1951 Rabbit Fire
1952 Rabbit Seasoning
1953 Up-Swept HareAnt PastedDuck! Rabbit, Duck!Robot Rabbit
1954 Design for LeavingQuack Shot
1955 Pests for GuestsBeanstalk BunnyHare BrushRabbit RampageThis Is a Life?Heir-Conditioned
1956 Bugs' BonnetsA Star Is BoredYankee Dood ItWideo Wabbit
1957 What's Opera, Doc?Rabbit Romeo
1958 Don't Axe MePre-Hysterical Hare
1959 A Mutt in a Rut
1960 Person to BunnyDog Gone People
1961 What's My Lion?
1962 Crow's Feat
1980 Portrait of the Artist as a Young Bunny
1990 Box Office Bunny
1991 Blooper Bunny
1992 Invasion of the Bunny Snatchers
2012 Daffy's Rhapsody
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